April 18, 2017. The Free Speech Movement 

April 20, 2017. Grape Boycott, Watts Uprising, Alcatraz Occupation

Free Speech Movement Multimedia 

  • Timeline of Free Speech Movement Events [[Krystal: this is made using the software I showed you Thursday]].

Mario Savio’s infamous Sproul Hall Sit-in Address on December 2, 1964 at the University of California, Berkeley was given at the height of the Free Speech Movement. Many students, including Savio, spent the summer on 1964 down in Mississippi registering black sharecroppers to vote during Freedom Summer. They were radicalized in the South and began to tune into the necessity for Free Speech on college campuses to protect and expand Civil Rights.

Berkeley in the Sixties (1990) directed by Mark Kitchell chronicles the emergence of the Free Speech Movement at the University of California, Berkeley in the fall semester of 1964. Kitchell masterfully uses oral history interviews and historical footage to integrate the story of SLATE and the student uprising in the larger historical context of the anti-Vietnam movement, the rise of the Black Panther Party, as well as the counter-culture.

Multimedia for Grape Boycott, Watts, & Alcatraz 

Weekly Assignments

  1. Your main objective this week is to finish your collaborative research assignment on the history of the Santa Anita Assembly Center & Riots.
  2. Compare and contrast the representations of the longer history and context of the Grape Boycotts represented in last week’s article on corporations and this week’s article on theology. What do you think the larger catalysts were and defining forces? Let me know in 1-2 paragraphs.
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Rhae Lynn Barnes is an Assistant Professor of American Cultural History at Princeton University (2018-) and President of the Andrew W. Mellon Society of Fellows in Critical Bibliography. She is the co-founder and C.E.O. of U.S. History Scene and an Executive Advisor to the documentary series "Reconstruction: America After the Civil War" (now streaming PBS, 2019).

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